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Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the Federal Aviation Regulations, are provided here for your reference.  To review most FAQ's about getting started in flying, this link is provided to the FAA site for your convenience. The information is based on FAA's rules, but is in a simplified form. You can read the FAA rules on pilot certification in Part 61 of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

PRIVATE PILOT CERTIFICATION COURSE

FOR CERTIFICATION TO FLY SINGLE ENGINE AIRPLANES

PRIVILEGES AND LIMITATIONS:

1.     Except as provided in paragraphs (2) through (7) of this section, no person who holds a private pilot certificate may act as pilot in command of an aircraft that is carrying passengers or property for compensation or hire; nor may that person, for compensation or hire, act as pilot in command of an aircraft.

2.     A private pilot may, for compensation or hire, act as pilot in command of an aircraft in connection with any business or employment if:

a.  The flight is only incidental to that business or employment; and

b.  The aircraft does not carry passengers or property for compensation or hire.

3.     A private pilot may not pay less than the pro rata share of the operating expenses of a flight with passengers, provided the expenses involve only fuel, oil, airport expenditures, or rental fees.

4.     A private pilot may act as pilot in command of a charitable, nonprofit, or community event flight described in 91.146, if the sponsor and pilot comply with the requirements of 91.146.

5.     A private pilot may be reimbursed for aircraft operating expenses that are directly related to search and location operations, provided the expenses involve only fuel, oil, airport expenditures, or rental fees, and the operation is sanctioned and under the direction and control of:

a.  A local, State, or Federal agency; or

b.  An organization that conducts search and location operations.

6.     A private pilot who is an aircraft salesman and who has at least 200 hours of logged flight time may demonstrate an aircraft in flight to a prospective buyer.

7.     A private pilot who meets the requirements of 61.69 may act as a pilot in command of an aircraft towing a glider or unpowered ultralight vehicle.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

1.     Be at least 17 years of age.

2.     Be able to read, speak & understand the English language.

3.     Obtain at least a current third-class medical certificate.

4.     Pass a knowledge and practical test.

AERONAUTICAL KNOWLEDGE:

1.     Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations that relate to Private Pilot privileges, limitations and flight operations.

2.     Accident reporting requirements of the National Transportation Safety Board.

3.     Use of the applicable portions of the Aeronautical Information Manual and FAA advisory circulars.

4.     Use of aeronautical charts for VFR navigation using pilotage, dead reckoning and navigation systems.

5.     Radio communication procedures.

6.     Recognition of critical weather situations from the ground and in flight, windshear avoidance and the procurement and use of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts;

7.     Safe and efficient operation of aircraft, including collision avoidance and recognition and avoidance of wake turbulence.

8.     Effects of density altitude on takeoff and climb performance.

9.    Weight and balance computations.

10.  Principles of aerodynamics, powerplants and aircraft systems.

11.  Stall awareness, spin entry, spins and spin recovery techniques for the airplane.

12.  Aeronautical decision making and judgment.

13.  Preflight action that includes:

a.  How to obtain information on runway lengths at airports of intended use, data on takeoff and landing distances, weather reports and forecasts and fuel requirements;

b.  How to plan for alternatives if the planned flight cannot be completed or delays are encountered.

AERONAUTICAL EXPERIENCE: 40 hours minimum to include 20 hours flight instruction and 10 solo training in the following maneuvers and procedures:

1.     Proper flight preparation procedures including preflight planning and preparation, power plant operation and aircraft systems.

2.     Taxiing operations including runups.

3.     Take offs and landings including normal and crosswinds.

4.     Straight and level flight and turns in both directions.

5.     Climbs and climbing turns.

6.     Airport traffic patterns including entry and departure procedures.

7.     Collision avoidance, windshear avoidance and wake turbulence avoidance.

8.     Descents with and without turns using high and low drag configurations.

9.     Flight at various airspeeds from cruise to slow flight.

10.  Stall entries from various flight attitudes and power combinations with recovery initiated at the first indication of a stall and from a full stall.

11.  Emergency procedures and equipment malfunctions.

12.  Ground reference maneuvers.

13.  Approaches to a landing area with simulated engine malfunctions.

14.  Slips to a landing.

15.  Go arounds.

16.  Use of aeronautical charts for VFR navigation using pilotage and dead reckoning with the aid of a magnetic compass.

17.  Use of aircraft performance charts pertaining to cross country flight.

18.  Procurement and analysis of aeronautical weather reports and forecasts, including recognition of critical weather situations and estimating visibility while in flight.

19.  Cross Country Emergency procedures.

20.  Traffic pattern procedures that include area departure, area arrival, entry into the traffic pattern and approach.

21.  Procedures and operating practices for collision avoidance, wake turbulence precautions and windshear avoidance.

22.  Recognition, avoidance and operational restrictions of hazardous terrain features in the geographical area where the cross country flight will be flown.

23.  Procedures for operating the instruments and equipment installed in the aircraft to be flown, including recognition and use of the proper operational procedures and indications.

24.  Use of radios for VFR navigation and two way communications.

25.  Take off, approach, and landing procedures, including short field, soft field and crosswind takeoffs, and approaches and landings.

26.  Climbs at best angle and best rate.

27.  Control and maneuvering solely by reference to flight instruments, including straight and level flight, turns, descents, climbs, use of radio aids and ATC directives.

28.  Performance maneuvers.

29.  Night operations.

30.  Postflight procedures.

COST:
AIRCRAFT: BE C23
40 Hours @ $111.30 (tax and fuel included)= $ 4452.00

INSTRUCTOR
30 hours @ $36.00 = $ 1080.00

PRE and POST GROUND SCHOOL
10 hours @ $24.00 = $ 240.00

TRAINING MATERIALS: Books, Manuals, Computer Test Guides, Charts and publications = $ 150.00

FAA KNOWLEDGE TEST = $ 150.00

FAA FLIGHT TEST = $ 250.00

MINIMUM TOTAL COST: $ 6,233.00